Tag Archives: Missouri

Our Biggest Sale Ever!


The most items ever on sale with the biggest reductions! We’ve got to make room and you’ll get the best deal ever. 

Starting July 1, all 50% yellow tags are an additional 50%.  The sale will end when Philip pulls the plug (probably when he feels faint!)

Come and get your Christmas shopping done early. 

See our Facebook page or Instagram account for a video of items.

We’ve reduced:

  • Cabinets
  • Majolica
  • Carved items
  • Blue and White Transferware
  • English smalls
  • Chairs
  • Trays
  • Stools
  • Pewter​

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Mad for Majolica in Missouri

MajolicaWelshDresser.JPG

A sampling of our majolica offerings. 

Our goal is to offer shoppers in SW Missouri a wonderful and unique assortment of beautiful antique and vintage objects for the home. Philip uses his 45 years in the art world to pick those items that are an affordable mix of color, design and value. One category that we are excited to carry at the store is the colorful majolica.

What exactly is Majolica?

Our majolica refers to pieces of earthenware (clay), formed in a mold, coated with white opaque tin enamel glaze, fired at a very high temperature, and then coated with bright colored glazes and then, fired again. The bright glazes, up to nine colors, were applied all at once. There are vibrant and rather heavy objects.

Majolica has its roots in the 16th century, but what we carry is a Victorian adaption and an anglicized version of Italian pottery. Shown first at The Great Exhibition in London in 1851, the English majolica was all the rage until the turn of the 1900s. This was the time of the Englishman’s great fascination with the nature world and the majolica pieces reflect this by using natural motifs, animals and plants.

How do you know what you are buying?

We are not experts so we rely on purchasing the majority of our majolica from three sources in England. These persons are experts and help us to find affordable pieces to pass onto our customers. Without their help, it would be too frustrating to bring in majolica. There are many reproductions on the market from overseas. The big three companies, Minton, Jones and Wedgwood, used a three to four digit black number to identify their pieces, but many of the Victorian majolica manufacturers left their wares unmarked. One important tip for a potential buyer is that the undersurface of a piece, including the bottom rim, is almost always glazed.

At our store, we stick to plates, pitchers, compotes and platters. Rather than purchasing a shelf-sitter, majolica can be hung on a wall, along with transferware or used on the table. We usually have several sets of green salad plates with raised designs of different leaves. With the emphasis on food and gourmet, these salad plates add another level of enjoyment to a dining experience.

Majolica makes a great gift and a colorful addition to any home.

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Our Lewis and Clark Antiquing Expedition.

Lewis and Clark Expedition Mural in downtown Kansas City.

Lewis and Clark Expedition Mural in downtown Kansas City.

Our son lives in the Kansas City area and we went to see him over the week preceding the Labor Day. So, of course, we planned to antique while he was at work. As it turned out, we spent most of our shopping time along the Missouri River, the old Lewis and Clark stomping grounds. We grabbed our map and emptied the van.

On the first day, we headed north of Kansas City to Platte City. As luck would have it, the best shopping was found at our first stop, at W.D. Pickers. It’s an actual “antique” mall with over 100 dealers. They carry antiques, not flea market/garage sale leftovers. The staff was friendly and the mall was clean and well organized.

Helpful staff at W.D. Pickers in Platte City, Missouri.

Helpful staff at W.D. Pickers in Platte City, Missouri.

From there, we joined up with the Missouri River and toured Weston Missouri. Heading north, we passed the Lewis and Clark Lake, where in 1804, the expedition passed and noted the large amount of baby geese. They named the lake “Goslings Lake”. We crossed the river into Kansas at Atchison and explored the town and did some limited shopping.

On the banks of the Missouri River at Atchison, Kansas.

On the banks of the Missouri River at Atchison, Kansas.

The Amelia Earhart Birthplace and Childhood Home is a National Historic Site, high on the west bank of the Missouri River.

The Amelia Earhart Birthplace and Childhood Home is a National Historic Site, high on the west bank of the Missouri River.

Early the next morning, we drove to the Sparks Kansas Antique and Collectible Flea Market. National magazines have grouped Sparks in with Brimfield and Round Top, so we were anticipating finding treasures galore. Big disappointment! This market cannot hold its own in the leagues of other national markets. The magazines got this one wrong. There are many vendors, but the choice items were non-existent. It took us less than 4 hours to walk the entire town and neighboring farms.

Finding stuff in a barn in Sparks, Kansas.

Finding stuff in a barn in Sparks, Kansas.

Yay for shade trees at the Sparks Kansas Antique and Collectible Flea Market.

Yay for shade trees at the Sparks Kansas Antique and Collectible Flea Market.

With temperatures in the low 90’s, we decided to move on to the next town, White Cloud. So following the Missouri River, our small expedition loaded into the van and headed north to the Nebraska state line. A small main street with shops and tents lined the way to a field where a tiny cluster of tents were set up.

Traveling on the roads and enjoying the scenery is a perk of antiquing. The flood land is flat near the river, but in this part of the four states, the rolling hills are steep, and towns are built on the bluffs. The glaciers that forced into the area 600,000 years ago made beautiful landscapes. We did one more stop in Leavenworth and went back to Kansas City for dinner with our son.

The next morning, we shopped on the First Friday weekend at the West Bottoms. We’ve written about West Bottoms before. It’s still a shopping destination and parking lots were full. We were there for the better part of a day. This is a good source for us to spot trends. The sellers are good at design and vignettes. We saw a lot of painted furniture and signs, and industrial seems to still be popular.

The picking was good in the West Bottoms of Kansas City.

The picking was good in the West Bottoms of Kansas City.

Most of the venues in the West Bottoms are located in huge old warehouses, which is part of the charm.

Most of the venues in the West Bottoms are located in huge old warehouses, which is part of the charm.

Others were having good luck picking at West Bottoms.

Others were having good luck picking at West Bottoms.

On Saturday, we headed up to antique stores in Parkville, Missouri, again on the Missouri River. It’s a cute little town, but no antiques that interested us. Over to Claycomo and then, crossing the river, we headed to the River Market. They have a Facebook page and it looked interesting; however, they don’t have our kind of stuff. Mostly 1960s retro. We’d say skip it.

Andrew is working on a project in Parkville, so we had to check it out.

Andrew is working on a project in Parkville, so we had to check it out.

River Market was a bust for us.

River Market was a bust for us.

It was a great week; we covered the Kansas City metro antique area (much more than we listed here), bought new inventory for the store and spent several evenings visiting with Andrew. A shout out to Damian and Alvina, who minded the store while we were out and about, following the river.

Hope you enjoyed our travel tale. Stop in the store and take a gander at the pickings!

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Vintiquing in the Cotwolds.

A beautiful Black and White arrangement in Tetbury.

A beautiful Black and White arrangement in Tetbury.

This is the second of 4 blogs on our May/June 2014 trip.

Philip filling up the car's boot with our purchases from Station Mill Antiques Centre.

Philip filling up the car’s boot with our purchases from Station Mill Antiques Centre.

With Stow-on-the-Wold as our base camp, we divided our time between antiquing and lollygagging. Antiquing in the golden villages of the Cotswolds tends towards the high-end. For example, that darling pub stool is from the 1600s and cost $1600. That’s what we would say is high-end. However, we are happy to report some of our best finds, cool and affordable, were found in the Cotswolds, we just had to look a little harder.

Winchcombe Antiques Centre.

Winchcombe Antiques Centre.

If you’ve read our previous blogs, you know that we tend to shop wherever we can, but we spend the majority of our money and time at large international fairs in the midlands of England, i.e. IACF Newark and Arthur Swallow Lincoln. In the Cotswolds, we focused our attention and efforts on antique centres. By doing so, we avoided the high-end furniture stores and found affordable items to bring back to Missouri. Thus, we did more vintiquing than antiquing, since the antiques in the UK are truly antiques. Once we found locations of the centres and markets, we eagerly mapped out our day trips and googled park-and-pay lots, so we were good to go, as long as the SatNav was working!

Fenwick and Fenwick in Broadway.

Fenwick and Fenwick in Broadway.

We drove down to the Cotswolds from the Manchester airport and stopped for lunch in Broadway, a beautiful, tidy village northwest of Stow. Here, we found a great first stop, Fenwick and Fenwick. The owner clearly loves the same antiques we do, and his shop is full of brown oak furniture, pewter and copper, carved wood and blue and white transferware. You could easily confuse our two stores, except his building was built in 1450. A little earlier than our 1953 building.

Antiques at the George in Burford. Philip was pleased with his purchases.

Antiques at the George in Burford. Philip was pleased with his purchases.

If you’re planning on shopping in the northern Cotswolds, let us guide you. Here are the places where we found our favorites.

  • Burford. Although there are several antique stores here, we only had success at two of them. Antiques at the George and Chris Walker’s shop on Tailor’s Row.
  • Chipping Norton. There are two good antique centres, one is on the east side of the town, The Quiet Woman, and the other is on the west side of the town, Station Mill Antique Centre. Both were large centres and there is something for everyone.
  • Moreton-in-Marsh. A busy market town with several shops and antique centers on the main road. We enjoyed our visit and would recommend antiquing here. Favorites included: Windsor House and London House.
  • Stow-on-the-Wold. Our residence for the week had many lovely shops, although most fell into the high-end category. Our favorite was the Tudor House.
  • Tetbury. This was our favorite shopping. Several centres and shops line Long Street. We spent a whole day here and it was here we found our favorite centre, Top Banana. We searched all five floors looking for interesting items and we emerged happy with our findings.
  • Winchcombe. There are several shops along High Street and the Winchcombe Antique Centre has two floors of affordable antiques. It was easy to combine antique shopping with visiting Sudeley Castle, so we made a day of it.
What was he thinking? That's French White and Grey not English Brown!

What was he thinking? That’s French White and Grey not English Brown!

We also visited Broadway, Bourton-on-the-Water, Chipping Campden, and Lechlade. Each village had one or more shops. Enough to entertain us, but not an antique destination.

The purchases under the stairs, neatly wrapped and ready for the container.

The purchases under the stairs, neatly wrapped and ready for the container.

 

 

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We’ve got a full house.

Our February England shopping trip inventory has arrived.

Philip's favorite new piece from the February trip.

Philip’s favorite new piece from the February trip.

The store is bursting at the seams with English carved furniture and enough fabulous smalls to fill up your “manor house”. From the early responses of our customers, it looks like we’ve succeeded in bringing more interesting items and nifty oddities to Springfield Missouri.

Carved Chairs

Carved Chairs

In February, we negotiated crackerjack prices and purchased many marvelous antiques in England. As always, we balance quality of the items with the dollar value, so that, everyone wins. You get a great treasure at a reasonable price and we get to go back on another shopping trip!

Blue Child's Chest

Blue Child’s Chest

Due to the amount of new inventory, we’ve temporary opened up a “sale room” where several items at being sold at our cost.

View of the store.

View of the store.

Drop in before all the bonny items are gone!

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What do you know about Thomas Hart Benton?

Thomas Hart Benton

Thomas Hart Benton

Visiting the home of the Missouri artist.

We visited the Kansas City home of artist Thomas Hart Benton last weekend. We had a nice private tour of his art studio and home, which is a Missouri State Historic Site. The Parks Department is celebrating the anniversary of Thomas Hart Benton’s birth 125 years ago in Neosho, Missouri.

Missouri State Historic Site.

Missouri State Historic Site.

After studying in Paris and living on the East Coast, Benton and his wife, Rita, and two children returned in Missouri in 1935. They purchased a huge limestone home and several acres in Kansas City for a mere $6000. Benton converted the carriage house into a car garage and an art studio. He was a successful artist and Rita sold his paintings out of their home.

Carriage House.

Carriage House.

It was in the art studio in 1975 when Benton dropped dead from a massive heart attack. At his age of 85, he was still doing what he loved most, painting a large mural. Following his death and that of his wife, the Missouri State Parks purchased the home and studio and all the furnishings. So, when we toured, it was just as if they had left for the day. The house is a mixture of family, art and music. They lived fairly simple, with nice furnishings, but nothing grand, other than the piano.

Philip with one of his favorite Benton paintings, Benton's son and his dog.

Philip with one of his favorite Benton paintings, Benton’s son and his dog.

The first artist to appear on the cover of Time Magazine, Benton was famous for his murals and oil paintings. He also did watercolors and sculptures. His favorite medium was egg tempera, a mixture of pigment, egg yolks and water, which he used to create his signature murals. Around his studio, you see dried tempera in jars, sculptures in clay, pencil drawings and empty frames. The art studio reflected the working artist, who took his designs from simple pencil drawings to grand sized murals.

Benton's art studio.

Benton’s art studio.

In Missouri, you can see his murals at the City Hall of Joplin Missouri, at the Harry S. Truman Library, and the Missouri State Capitol Building. The home is located at 3616 Belleview Avenue, KCMO.

Our family touring group on the main stairs of the Benton family home.

Our family touring group on the main stairs of the Benton family home.

If we play the Six Degrees of Separation, the obvious connections are Missouri and oil paintings. But if we dig a little deeper, we find that his family traces their roots back to Lincolnshire in England and that’s where we buy most of our antiques for the store.

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When we shop in England.

We’ve been enough times that we experience some sameness.

Philip in full shopping mode, with our plaid trolley.

Philip in full shopping mode, with our plaid trolley.

We know the weather will be fickle, but often nicer than in SW Missouri. And since we spend most of our days out in the weather, we are “Boy Scout” prepared. On our February England antique shopping trip, we each took two coats and used them both separately and at the same time on the same day.

Seller from France. And yes, we bought those chairs!

Seller from France. And yes, we bought those chairs!

We’ll meet new sellers. Some of these will become our “go-to” each trip; and others, we will try to avoid henceforth. If we find a new source for antiques, we hope their attitude is positive and not pushy. On the most part, we’re dealing with the British, who are polite, professional and friendly. They say “Thank You” and mean it.

See what we mean?

See what we mean?

We’ll eat yummy farm fresh food. At the Lincoln fair, we had a homemade melt-in-your mouth meringue filled with fruit and fresh whipped cream. OMG! We’ll try new things (parsnips!), but we will miss salads, iced tea, and Mexican chips and salsa.

Successful Royal Shield.

Successful Royal Shield.

We’ll be loaded down with coins. The £2 (Philip’s favourite) and £1 (Theresa’s favourite) coins, along with the lesser ones, can weigh down our pockets. It’s just easier to hand someone a £5 note and get change back than to stare at the coins in your hand and try to make sense of them. At the end of the day, we see if we have the right coins to form a Royal Shield. We enjoy small pleasures.

Filming BBC’s Bargain Hunt’s host, Tim Wonnacott.

Filming BBC’s Bargain Hunt’s host, Tim Wonnacott.

We’ll be in the way of some film crew at a fair. Especially at the IACF’s Newark fair. There is area near the Red Gate called the Shopping Arcades and it is a prime target for film crews. There’s wonderful antiques artfully displayed and shoppers galore, so the antique reality television shows set up shots in this location. We try to shop here late on the first day and, each time, we’ve been either in the way or in the shot. Let’s hope they edit us out. We can just imagine an elderly couple sipping their tea and watching their favourite “Antique Show” and the woman shouts out, “There they are again! Blimey, why are they wearing those two coats?”

Another given: Philip will be asleep as soon as we’re in our room at the hotel.

Another given: Philip will be asleep as soon as we’re in our room at the hotel.

No word yet on the arrival of the container. Stayed tuned!

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Where do you plan to retire?

Many people retire to the Ozarks including Daniel Boone’s youngest son, Nathan.

Nathan Boone's home near Ash Grove Mo.

Nathan Boone’s home near Ash Grove Mo.

Nowadays, people are drawn to the Ozarks for various reasons: a lower cost of living, great healthcare, the lakes, having a moderate four season climate, etc. But why, in 1837, would you build a cabin in the Missouri Territory, amidst the government pushing out the native Indian tribes of the Osage and Kickapoo? On Sunday, we drove to the Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site near Ash Grove, Mo. to find out more about this frontier man.

Nathan Boone's homestead.

Nathan Boone’s homestead.

We think Nathan Boone had visited the area during his surveying days and fell in love with the rolling hills and clear streams, a place where he and his family could put down roots and build a new life. He had ventured into the American West as a surveyor, trapper, hunter, and soldier and his family saw an opportunity to buy up large quantities of land, vacated by the Indian tribes.

Boone House.

Boone House.

Whatever the reason, Nathan and his wife, Olive, and their family (14 children were born to the couple) arrived in 1834. Settlers were moving into the area as the Indian removal continued. By 1837, three of his sons and two of his slaves built a double log house in the newly established Greene County. Boone Township was established around the same time as the township of Springfield was formed.  The small Ozark farm grew to more than 700 acres.

Nathan continued his military career into Indian Territory and surveying, all the while his family remained in Boone Township.  By 1853, he was done with the military and retired to his home. He died in 1856. We hope he savored his retirement in the Ozarks.

Ash Tree Antiques in Ash Grove, Mo.

Ash Tree Antiques in Ash Grove, Mo.

We enjoyed our Sunday afternoon visit to the State Historic Site. And of course, we managed to check out two antique/flea markets in the town of Ash Grove. The “Ash Tree” and “Kaydee Jo’s Treasures” are located across Maple Street from each other. Both are small booth-type markets carrying few antiques and mostly vintage items.

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Out and About.

Summer Shopping Discoveries.

Henry's Antiques in Lee Summit.

Henry’s Antiques in Lee Summit.

Some people choose theme parks for their free time. (Silver Dollar City has a new, crazy cool roller coaster). Some people head out to nature parks. We spend our free time looking for antiques. This summer, we’ve found several new-to-us stores and we thought we share three of them with you.

Brown’s Emporium. An antique mall in Independence Mo. 13720 E. US 40 Hwy. This mall is located in a shopping center at the northwest corner of the intersection. It’s a typical mall, where you roam up and down the aisles, peering into the small booths. Antiques are scattered, but are available. Clean and bright. Helpful professional desk checkout. We’ll return here.

Henry’s Antiques Collectibles & Tea Room. A decorator antique store in Lee’s Summit, Mo. 401 SE Douglas. This store is located in historic downtown Lee’s Summit in a historic church. They have a good eye and a small selection of antique furniture and smalls. The majority of their items are decorative, which they present in a pleasing manner. Every inch of the old church is full, including the stairwell. In the basement is an european-style tea room. The tea room is closed on Sundays, so we didn’t get a chance to try it out.

Southside Antique Mall. An antique mall in Joplin, MO. 4402 E. 32nd St. This mall is located in a multi-tenant building on the south side of the street. This is a large, typical mall. Depending on the booth, antique furniture and smalls were available and at good prices. They had a good selection of vintage Americana.

Do you have a favorite antique shop or mall we should know about?

Recent Majolica purchases.

Recent Majolica purchases.

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Following the Clues.

This is a story of how an antique chest found its way into our home.

In May, Philip attended one of Bob Kollmeyer auctions in a nearby neighborhood. He had seen the auction listing in the Sunday paper and checked out the inventory online. So, off to the auction he went, and following a round of competitive bidding, he won a four-drawer chest.

Walnut Chest purchased at auction.

Walnut Chest purchased at auction.

The chest came home, rather the store, because of its size and the lack of room on the floor of the store. The chest was cleaned and we noticed some faint writing on the back of the piece. It read “R.A. Brown 1842 Roane County, Tennessee to Cass County, MO”. Enter Theresa, who quickly searched the internet and found an interesting story about a family who thought enough about this piece of furniture to load it on a wagon (and it’s not light!) and bring it from their home in Tennessee to Cass County.

Cass County is located SE of Kansas City. Further investigation on the internet found that the house that R. A.  Brown built is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Additional information led us to the exact location of the house and its many outbuildings. So, this past weekend, when we were in the Kansas City metro area helping our son move, we ended up in Harrisonville. Turning off Highway 291 onto a gavel country road, we crossed a creek and there, up on hill, was the red brick two-story L-shaped home with several red outbuildings.

R. A. Brown house near Harrisonville, Mo.

R. A. Brown house near Harrisonville, Mo.

So, we’ve come to the end of our story and it’s looks like Philip isn’t going to part with his latest find. Especially now that he has the plans of the house and the family tree of the previous owners!

 

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