Revisiting Hampton Court Palace

Main entrance to Hampton Court Palace. The Thames is on the right. We purchased tickets on the left and then walked up and through the main gate (the door in the middle).

Main entrance to Hampton Court Palace. The Thames is on the right. We purchased tickets on the left and then walked up and through the main gate (the door in the middle).

Part V of our spring antique shopping trip report

Did you know that we started dating in January 1981 while in England? We were on a Drury University Winter Term trip (Theresa as a student and Philip as an alumni’s friend). During our three weeks in England and Wales, we stopped at the Hampton Court Palace for a brief tour and walk around the gardens. Now, in 2016, we returned to London to attend two antique fairs and between the fairs, we spent an afternoon revisiting the palace.

Chapel Court Garden. Henry VIII's recreated garden with plants found in the 16th century.

Chapel Court Garden. Henry VIII’s recreated garden with plants found in the 16th century.

Most people know of Hampton Court Palace. It’s the estate that Henry VIII took away from Cardinal Wolsey, when he fell out of favor with the King. That particular historic period, the Tudors, is a favorite of ours, so going back gave us a chance to do more exploring and learning about Henry VIII.

Hampton Court Palace is a museum and no longer an active royal palace. The 6 acres are situated on the north shore of the Thames about 14 miles southwest of Buckingham Palace. In 2015, it celebrated its 500 year anniversary. It’s been open to the public since 1838 and no monarch has lived there since George II. The palace building can be separated into three time periods: The Tudors (1509-1547), The Stuarts and The Georgian monarchs. Since time was limited, we focused on exploring the rooms associated with Henry VIII: his apartments, his Kitchens, the Chapel, and the Great Hall.

One of the rooms of the ginormous kitchens built by Henry VIII to feed his guests, court and staff.

One of the rooms of the ginormous kitchens built by Henry VIII to feed his guests, court and staff.

We’ve been in many castles and famous houses, but we were excited by the Henry VIII’s kitchens. The enormous kitchens and food halls show how the staff managed to feed 600 people twice a day during Henry’s reign.

After three hours of touring just a portion of the palace, we headed out into the gardens to have ice cream in the area where Henry VIII held jousting tournaments. It was a good day.

Up next, our last installment on the IACF’s Monday Market at Sandown and Sunbury Antique Market at Kempton Park.

Fountain Court designed by Sir Christopher Wren from 1689-94.

Fountain Court designed by Sir Christopher Wren from 1689-94.

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