“Roses and Castles” on Useful Household Objects.

Sample of "Roses"

Sample of “Roses”

We like to buy folk art pieces for the store because of the combination of art and utility. At any given time, we will have hooked rugs, lace, woven pillowcases, samplers, painted paper mache’ trays, woven coverlets, and toleware for sale in the store. The last time we shopped in England, we found several examples of another folk art, the “Roses and Castles”.

Folk art milk jug at the store.

Folk art milk jug at the store.

“Roses and Castles” is another name for folk art made by people who sail the narrowboats on the canals in England. There are more than 2,000 miles of canals in England and Wales and it is estimated that over 35,000 narrowboats, or canal boats are sailing today. Just imagine spending the summer leisurely sailing and crisscrossing the island. As you sail, you decorate your watering can using your paints and brush.

A traditional paintwork.

A traditional paintwork.

Painting objects on the narrowboats began in the late 1800s, when many of the working boats were turned into homes, rather than for transporting cargo. Typically, the rose is the illustration used on regular household and garden objects, pails, buckets, watering cans, etc. More elaborate items have painted castles on them. The interior and exterior of the narrowboats are also painted, as are door frames and windows.

Rose motif

Rose motif

Stop by the store and take a look around at the folk art pieces. Be inspired to create or surround yourself with beautiful objects that make you smile.

A Rose and Castle lidded jug. English, antique.

A Rose and Castle lidded jug. English, antique.

Watering can, English, metal, painted with "Roses", narrowboat antique.

Watering can, English, metal, painted with “Roses”, narrowboat antique.

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Filed under Knowledge/History of Antique Item, New Treasure Found

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